Image Quality
Page 1 of 1
Rebecca K. on Mar 25 2013 12:01PM #1
I downloaded an area that covered project site (which looked good at 1" = 600') with the intent of zooming into certain areas, but when I zoomed in the area of interest it was completely pixelated (to be viewed at 1" =300'). So I paid for another aerial of just the AOI and the image quality was much better. Why is the image quality so much different between the 2 downloads? Why couldn't I view the first download with the same quality as the second?
Brett P. on Mar 25 2013 12:30PM #2
Hi Rebecca,

You do not have the ability to zoom-in or or zoom-out on the purchased imagery. The preview viewer is a customization tool to select the appropriate amount of area and scale desired. The downsize of the small scale is that it may require multiple purchases to cover a large tract of land.

That being said if you make a mistake with the scale please do not hesitate to contact me as we often can allow you to modify an order free of charge. Please do not hesitate to contact me at 480-967-6752, ext 207.

-Brett
David H. on Apr 15 2013 3:23PM #3
Along the same lines, I would like to order stereo pairs (ca. 40% overlap); how do I do this without having to place two time consuming orders, which may not end up being sufficiently accurately located to easily view as stereo. Also, my order at 1 in to 810 feet was far too pixelated to be useful for detailed geologic interpretation. How can I obtain greater resolution at the same scale (larger files, obviously). Is what we see at this scale your best resolution? At $20/image, I cannot be experimenting. David H.
Brett P. on Apr 18 2013 12:26AM #4
Hi Dave,

I think you have confused our product with a conventional aerial photograph. We provide digital orthophotos. In my opinion, the stereoscope is a realic of the past, i.e. type writer, eight track player. It is a pet peeve of mine so please accept my apology by coming across salty. However, a true 3D experience can only be achieved by incorporating an orthophoto with a DEM in GIS opposed to the allusion created by a stereoscope.

Our imagery at a scale of 810 feet should not be pixelated. You must be attempting to change the scale by zooming-in on the orthophoto. You are correct about the larger files, the pyramid layers have been removed to reduce the file size.

If more detailed interpretation is required the imagery needs to be purchased at better scale, i.e 200 feet. However, this means less land area will be included with the photo. Again this is to reduce the file size. If you would like to modify your purchased image for a more zoomed-in version contact me 480-967-6752, ext 207 for a free exchange.
David H. on Apr 19 2013 5:20PM #5
Thanks, I'll consider whether I need to go further with the imagery.

You need to consider your clients' needs a bit more. Viewing of images with a stereoscope has been used as a vital tool of our geologic practice since at least the 1930s. You, as an expert with imagery handling, might be able to achieve a "true 3D experience" with DEM (whatever that is) / GIS, but that is beyond my capabilities and needs. I would purchase quite a bit of your imagery if I could use it for my geologic work at a scale (best) of around 800 feet.

I viewed the 810 feet imagery with 2 and 4 times enlargement, maybe that's why the pixelation occurred.

Thanks again, David
Brett P. on Apr 20 2013 12:32PM #6
Hi David,

I appreciate your professional response. We need to do a better job of educating as well as seek the advice of those in your industry.

Our photographs which have been geometrically "corrected" so as to be usable as a map. In other words, an orthophoto is a simulation of a photograph taken from an infinite distance, looking straight down to nadir. The perspective necessary for a steroscope has been removed. If you are available off-line, I would like to make it a priority to speak with you.

Best Regards

Brett
Paul F. on Jul 20 2013 12:27PM #7
Where is the file information on what your are actually buying regarding the image size and resolution?
Page 1 of 1
Add your voice to the conversation...
You must be logged in to post.
Twitter
In partnership with:

USDA

USGS